Diet/Eating Advice; What to do!

How often I get called/emails from MGB patients that are not doing well. I ask for a “food diary”
Low an behold they are eating “crap” sugar, fat candy processed meats etc and not eating yogurt fresh fruits and vegetables.
Surprisingly they do not feel well
….
Read this book
Eat healthy food, not too much (yogurt, fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains)

DrR ;-)

Amplify’d from well.blogs.nytimes.com
“I would love to have a pamphlet I could give to patients.” They didn’t have time to give them a big nutrition lecture. They liked the simple rule concept.
Well - Tara Parker-Pope on Health

January 8, 2010, 10:12 am

Michael Pollan Offers 64 Ways to Eat Food

How did your great grandparents ever figure out what to eat? Long before nutrition scientists began studying food, long before marketers began advertising food and long before the author Michael Pollan started writing about food, people, somehow, managed to eat more healthfully than they do now.

“We know there is a deep reservoir of food wisdom out there, or else humans would not have survived to the extent we have,” Mr. Pollan writes in his new book “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual” (Penguin). “Much of this food wisdom is worth preserving and reviving and heeding.”

To compile the rules for his book, which total 64, Mr. Pollan says he consulted folklorists, anthropologists, doctors, nurses, nutritionists and dietitians “as well as a large number of mothers and grandmothers.” He solicited rules from his own readers and audiences at conferences and speeches. He also posted a request to readers of the Well blog, who delivered more than 2,500 suggestions.

The result is a useful and funny purse-sized manual that could easily replace all the diet books on your bookshelf.

I love this book not only for its simplicity and practical advice, but because the rules themselves are memorable and will ring in your head long after you read it. Choosing just one rule that is new to you from each of the book’s three sections would certainly lead to meaningful changes in your eating habits.

Read more at well.blogs.nytimes.com

 

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