Low Revision Rate for the MGB

From January 2001 to December 2009, ** 1322 patients ** (996 women and 326 men, mean age 31.6 ± 9.1 years, mean body mass index 40.2 ± 7.4 kg/m(2)), had ** MGB **

Of the 1322 patients,
** 23 (1.7%) ** required revision surgery during
** a follow-up of 9 years. **

revision was for:
malnutrition in 9
inadequate weight loss in 8
** bile reflux ** in 3 out of 1,322!!!

Conclusion MGB appears to be By Far the best form of long term bariatric surgery.

Amplify’d from www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2010 Oct 30. [Epub ahead of print]

Revisional surgery for laparoscopic minigastric bypass.

Source

Department of Surgery, Min-Sheng General Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Laparoscopic minigastric bypass (LMGB), a sleeved gastric tube with Billroth II anastomosis, has been proposed as an alternative to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) for morbid obesity. However, the data regarding revision surgery after LMGB during long-term follow-up is not clear.

METHODS:

From January 2001 to December 2009, 1322 patients (996 women and 326 men, mean age 31.6 ± 9.1 years, mean body mass index 40.2 ± 7.4 kg/m(2)), who were enrolled in a surgically supervised weight loss program and had undergone LMGB were included. All the patients received regular yearly follow-up, and all the clinical data were prospectively collected and stored. The reasons and type of surgery for revision surgery were identified and analyzed.

RESULTS:

The excess weight loss and mean body mass index at 5 years after LMGB was 72.1% and 27.1 ± 4.6 kg/m(2). Of the 1322 patients, 23 (1.7%) had undergone revision surgery during a follow-up of 9 years. The estimated accumulated revision rate of 9 years was 2.69% for LMGB. The most common cause of revision was malnutrition in 9 (39.1%), followed by inadequate weight loss in 8 (34.7%), and intractable bile reflux and dissatisfaction each in 3 (13.0%). The type of revision surgery was LRYGB in 11 (47.8%), sleeve gastrectomy in 10 (43.5%), and conversion to a normal anatomic state in 2 (8.6%). All the revision procedures were performed using a laparoscopic approach, without major complications. Two patients underwent repeat second revision surgery to duodenal switch and biliopancreatic diversion each in 1 patient. All patients had satisfactory results after revision surgery. No patients had undergone revision surgery for internal hernia or ileus during the follow-up period.

CONCLUSION:

LMGB resulted in significant and sustained weight loss with an acceptably low revision rate at long-term follow-up. Revision surgery after LMGB can be performed using a laparoscopic approach with a low risk.

Copyright © 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Read more at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

 

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