Sleeve Gastrectomy; Another Bad Idea

In the present study, Sleeve Gastrectomy showed persistence of GERD symptoms in patients with GERD preoperatively.

Also, patients who did not have GERD preoperatively had an increased risk of postoperative GERD symptoms after Sleeve!!

Another bad idea by American Bariatric surgeons:
Jejunal ileal bypass = abandoned/failure
Stomach stapling = abandoned/failure
Lapband = abandoned/failure (in Europe and coming to America, I believe it will be abandoned)
RNY = why are Drs trying so many other operations?
Sleeve = 50% failure from reflux or weight regain reported from Europe, I believe it will be abandoned

Amplify’d from www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
In the present study, LSG correlated with the persistence of GERD symptoms in patients with GERD preoperatively. Also, patients who did not have GERD preoperatively had an increased risk of postoperative GERD symptoms.
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2011 Mar 21. [Epub ahead of print]

Association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

Source

Midwest Surgical Associates, LaGrange, Illinois.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common co-morbidity identified in obese patients. It is well established that patients with GERD and morbid obesity experience a marked improvement in their GERD symptoms after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Conflicting data exist for adjustable laparoscopic gastric banding and GERD. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become a popular adjunct to bariatric surgery in recent years. However, very little data exist concerning LSG and its effect on GERD.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review was performed of 176 LSG patients from January 2006 to August of 2009. The preoperative and postoperative GERD symptoms were evaluated using follow-up surveys and chart review.

RESULTS:

Of the 176 patients, 85.7% of patients were women, with an average age of 45 years (range 22-65). The average preoperative body mass index was 46.6 kg/m(2) (range 33.2-79.6). The average excess body weight lost at approximately 6, 12, 24 months was calculated as 54.2%, 60.7%, and 60.3%, respectively. Of the LSG patients, 34.6% had preoperative GERD complaints. Postoperatively, 49% complained of immediate (within 30 d) GERD symptoms, 47.2% had persistent GERD symptoms that lasted >1 month after LSG, and 33.8% of patients were taking medication specifically for GERD after LSG. The most common symptoms were heartburn (46%), followed by heartburn associated with regurgitation (29.2%).

CONCLUSION:

In the present study, LSG correlated with the persistence of GERD symptoms in patients with GERD preoperatively. Also, patients who did not have GERD preoperatively had an increased risk of postoperative GERD symptoms.

Copyright © 2011 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21429818
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Read more at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

 

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